Lesson Plan Redo

I will admit that at the start I was not too fond of using the “Backwards by design” method. I found it very hard to come up with the assessment portion right off the bat. However, after having more practice with it, I have come to believe that it is the most effective way to prepare a lesson.

We were given the task of reforming a lesson on the canadian climate. It is easy to pick out the downfalls of someone else’s lesson, but I found it difficult to come up with a better lesson.

My group kept the original outcome, but picked a different indicator that we felt fit better. The assessment is the most important component of a lesson and it makes sense to determine your assessment before creating the lesson. Therefore, once we decided on an assessment, we had no problems coming up with an effective lesson. Another component of the backwards by design template that I often forget about is the “I Can” statements. These statements are essential for student understanding and I find them very helpful when design a lesson plan.

Another component that I like about the backwards by design template is the treaty connections section, which I often tend to forget in my lessons. A reoccurring problem that I often run into is finding a treaty outcome that fits with Saskatchewan’s curriculum outcomes. However, I have come to realize that I don’t need to pick an outcome or indicator from the list, but I can create my own while still making a connection to treaty education.

 

 

Subject/Grade:  SS 5     Lesson Title: Canadian Climates    Teacher: Shelby, Dustan, April

Stage 1: Identify Desired Results

Outcome(s)/Indicator(s):

DR5.2 — Assess the impact of the environment on the lives of people living in Canada.

Indicators:

b. Explain how different traditional worldviews of Earth affect the use of resources in Canada (Aboriginal VS. European attitudes towards ownership and use of the land).

Treaty Ed connections:

TR31: Examine the relationships between First Nation peoples and the land, before and after the …………. .            signing of the treaties.  

  • Discuss the worldviews associated with ownership of the land and consider the impact those views have on a person’s relationship to the land.                   

SI32: Examine how various teachings people have about the natural world guide behaviour and ………   …………….actions.        

  • Analyze how First Nation peoples’ beliefs guide relationships with the land and natural world.
  • Compare the First Nations and British Crown view of the treaties with respect to land and ownership.                                

HC13 : Explore the many ways people meet their needs from nature and the land on which they live.

  • Describe various uses (e.g., food, clothing, shelter) of buffalo, elk, moose, and caribou, now and in the past.  
  • Compare how people, past and present, live on the land (e.g., agriculture, ranching, trapping, fishing, dwellings, and modes of transportation).                                
Key Understandings: (‘I Can’ statements)

  • I can describe Aboriginal ways of understanding land and its impact on the use of land and its resources.
  • I can describe European ways of understanding land and its impact on the use of land and its resources.
  • I can explain the differences and similarities between European and Aboriginal ways of understanding land.
  • I can reflect on how these differences may impact the Canadian environment and its inhabitants.  
Essential Question:
How does the lives of different people living in Canada have an impact on the Canadian environment?
Foundational Questions:
How are European and Aboriginal attitudes towards ownership of land and land use similar and different?
If two groups have vastly different views of what land is and how to use it, what difficulties might arise when making agreements about that land?

Stage 2: Determine Evidence for Assessing Learning

Formative Assessment:

  • Students will demonstrate that they have an understanding of the differences and similarities of European and Aboriginal attitudes towards ownership of land and use of land and its resources by creating a Venn Diagram.
  • Students will demonstrate a deeper understanding of the topic by writing a reflective piece on what they believe some of the difficulties might be when two groups with vastly different views make agreements about land ownership and use.

Stage 3: Build Learning Plan

Set (Warm-up, Focusing the Learning):  Time: 10 minutes
Students will watch the following videos to gain initial insight on European and Aboriginal views of land ownership and use. Throughout each video, students will write down what they believe to be key points.
Play this YOUTUBE VIDEO on how Europeans view land ownership and land use — remove stereotyping, grouping and judgement by stating that not all European individuals believe in this way of living.  
Play this YOUTUBE VIDEO on how the FIrst Nations people view land ownership and land use — remove stereotyping, grouping and judgement by stating that not all First Nations communities live the exact same way; however, this is a main component in their way of living.
Development:                                              Time: 35 minutes

  • Create a T-chart on the board — one side labelled European and the other: First Nations
  • Each student will be given a paragraph that is either an example of a European or First Nations worldview of land ownership and use.
  • One at a time, each student will read his/her paragraph out loud. As a class, students must decide if this is an example of a European or First Nations worldview and why they think this is. “Whys” will be written on the board in the T chart under the corresponding choice.
    • Through this activity, students may begin to see that there are not only differences between the two worldviews, but similarities as well.
  • After each student has read their statement — Individually, students will create a Venn Diagram based on the information in the T-chart. It is up to the students to differentiate between the similarities and differences between European and First Nations worldviews of land ownership and use.

Learning Closure: Exit Slip                                  Time: 5 min.
Individually, students will write a short reflective response on the following question:
If two groups have vastly different views of what land is and how to use it, what difficulties do you think might arise when making agreements about that land?

Each student’s Venn Diagram and reflective response will be handed in at the end of class.

Materials/Equipment:

  • Projector
  • Computer for Youtube Videos
  • Whiteboard and markers
  • Looseleaf and pencils
  • Printed examples of European and First Nations worldviews on land ownership and use

Management Strategies:

  • Make sure students stay on task by circulating around the room
  • Provide different learning opportunities for different learning styles — visual, oral, individual, group learning

Safety Considerations: n/a
Possible Adaptations/

Differentiation:

  • Provide a written visual of the speaking in the YouTube videos for some students to follow along with and have the needed information in front of them.
  • If a student is uncomfortable or unable to speak in front of the class, they may write student responses on the board throughout the development portion of the lesson.
Stage 4: Reflection
To be completed after the implementation of the lesson.
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